New Nebosh Course in Peshawar

100,000.00 Rs
Condition: New
Transaction: Exchange
The Islamic Financial System
While elimination of "Riba" or interest in all its forms is an important feature of the Islamic financial system, Islamic banking is much more. At the heart of Islam is a sense of cooperation, to help one another according to principles of goodness and piety (but not to cooperate in evil or malice). In essence, it aims to eliminate exploitation and to establish a just society by the application of the Shari'ah or Islamic rulings to the operations of banks and other financial institutions. To ensure compliance to the Shari'ah, Islamic banks use the services of religious boards comprised of Shari'ah scholars.

Islamic finance may be viewed as a form of ethical investing, or ethical lending, except that no loans are possible unless they are interest-free. Among the ethical restrictions is the prohibition on alcohol and gambling and the consumption of pork. Islamic funds would never knowingly invest in companies involved in gambling, alcoholic beverages, or porcine food products

Its practitioners and clients need not be Muslim, but they must accept the ethical restrictions underscored by Islamic values.

The Concepts
Islamic economic principles offers a balance between extreme capitalism and communism. It offers the individual the freedom to produce and create wealth, while surrounding the individual with an environment controlled, not by human rulers, but by Divine Guidance, which sets moral rules and norms of behaviour that must require the utmost sincerity of intention. When these rules and norms are internalised and acted upon by people, peace and prosperity result for the wider society.

The Qur'an (2:30) says that man was created as the representative of God on earth. This concept has a considerable effect on Islamic business, since the lack of a sense of absolute ownership promotes a sense working for society, especially the needy.

This is not some philosophical concept, removed from the daily life of the society. It manifests itself in all the different aspects of lives. What makes the trader, banker, agriculturist or research and development scientist perform his job to the best of his ability? In capitalist economies, it is the notion of competition. This involves the necessity to constantly produce more new things for profit to keep up with others and this makes for wastage and often generates unbridled greed. But in an economy based on Islamic principles, the idea of man representing God on earth gives businessmen a feeling of co-operating with others for the good of society as a whole, including himself. Thus Quranic guidance enables man to conserve and use prudently all the resources of the earth that God has given mankind.

The Essentials
Divine Guidance for the economy, as enshrined in the Qur'an and the Sunnah (the living example of Prophet Muhammad), can be summarised as follows:

1. Trusteeship
The Qur'an (57:7) emphasises that all the resources of the earth belong to God, the Creator, who has made human beings a trustee for them. Humans are therefore accountable to God for the uses they make of these resources. The idea of trusteeship distinguishes the Islamic approach to economics from materialistic approaches such as extreme capitalism and socialism. It introduces a moral and spiritual element into business life and has been made practicable by creating rules to govern individual behaviour and public policy.

2. Care For Others
Care for others tempers self-interest, which is ingrained in human nature. It goes naturally with trusteeship, since, in caring for others, one also serves God, who created all humans. No one can have fulfilment or happiness in his life without interacting with others. Thus individual happiness and collective interests go hand in hand.

We gain through giving, since it would be impossible for everyone to acquire while giving nothing. The Qur'an states this in 30:39 and 2:276. It follows that Islam discourages indulgence in luxuries. One is expected to consider what is available to others before acquiring good things for oneself. Moderation in consumption is mentioned in the Qur'an 7:31.

People who believe that they can increase their wealth through charging others interest and by reducing charitable giving are under an illusion. The wealth and integrity of a society can only increase when the rich give part of their wealth to the needy for no other motivation than to please God. Those who have faith and a vision of their future life understand this.

To think only of how to gain profit for oneself leads to using others as mere instruments. In societies where unbridled self-interest is allowed to dominate unchecked, there is no protection for the weak against the strong. Thus exclusive pursuit of self-interest, when not tempered by charity, is self- defeating.

3. Productive Effort as a Means of Serving God
Islam emphasises the duty of every individual to work for his living. Productive enterprise is looked upon as a means of serving
New Nebosh Course in Peshawar
100,000.00 Rs
New
Exchange
The Islamic Financial System
While elimination of "Riba" or interest in all its forms is an important feature of the Islamic financial system, Islamic banking is much more. At the heart of Islam is a sense of cooperation, to help one another according to principles of goodness and piety (but not to cooperate in evil or malice). In essence, it aims to eliminate exploitation and to establish a just society by the application of the Shari'ah or Islamic rulings to the operations of banks and other financial institutions. To ensure compliance to the Shari'ah, Islamic banks use the services of religious boards comprised of Shari'ah scholars.

Islamic finance may be viewed as a form of ethical investing, or ethical lending, except that no loans are possible unless they are interest-free. Among the ethical restrictions is the prohibition on alcohol and gambling and the consumption of pork. Islamic funds would never knowingly invest in companies involved in gambling, alcoholic beverages, or porcine food products

Its practitioners and clients need not be Muslim, but they must accept the ethical restrictions underscored by Islamic values.

The Concepts
Islamic economic principles offers a balance between extreme capitalism and communism. It offers the individual the freedom to produce and create wealth, while surrounding the individual with an environment controlled, not by human rulers, but by Divine Guidance, which sets moral rules and norms of behaviour that must require the utmost sincerity of intention. When these rules and norms are internalised and acted upon by people, peace and prosperity result for the wider society.

The Qur'an (2:30) says that man was created as the representative of God on earth. This concept has a considerable effect on Islamic business, since the lack of a sense of absolute ownership promotes a sense working for society, especially the needy.

This is not some philosophical concept, removed from the daily life of the society. It manifests itself in all the different aspects of lives. What makes the trader, banker, agriculturist or research and development scientist perform his job to the best of his ability? In capitalist economies, it is the notion of competition. This involves the necessity to constantly produce more new things for profit to keep up with others and this makes for wastage and often generates unbridled greed. But in an economy based on Islamic principles, the idea of man representing God on earth gives businessmen a feeling of co-operating with others for the good of society as a whole, including himself. Thus Quranic guidance enables man to conserve and use prudently all the resources of the earth that God has given mankind.

The Essentials
Divine Guidance for the economy, as enshrined in the Qur'an and the Sunnah (the living example of Prophet Muhammad), can be summarised as follows:

1. Trusteeship
The Qur'an (57:7) emphasises that all the resources of the earth belong to God, the Creator, who has made human beings a trustee for them. Humans are therefore accountable to God for the uses they make of these resources. The idea of trusteeship distinguishes the Islamic approach to economics from materialistic approaches such as extreme capitalism and socialism. It introduces a moral and spiritual element into business life and has been made practicable by creating rules to govern individual behaviour and public policy.

2. Care For Others
Care for others tempers self-interest, which is ingrained in human nature. It goes naturally with trusteeship, since, in caring for others, one also serves God, who created all humans. No one can have fulfilment or happiness in his life without interacting with others. Thus individual happiness and collective interests go hand in hand.

We gain through giving, since it would be impossible for everyone to acquire while giving nothing. The Qur'an states this in 30:39 and 2:276. It follows that Islam discourages indulgence in luxuries. One is expected to consider what is available to others before acquiring good things for oneself. Moderation in consumption is mentioned in the Qur'an 7:31.

People who believe that they can increase their wealth through charging others interest and by reducing charitable giving are under an illusion. The wealth and integrity of a society can only increase when the rich give part of their wealth to the needy for no other motivation than to please God. Those who have faith and a vision of their future life understand this.

To think only of how to gain profit for oneself leads to using others as mere instruments. In societies where unbridled self-interest is allowed to dominate unchecked, there is no protection for the weak against the strong. Thus exclusive pursuit of self-interest, when not tempered by charity, is self- defeating.

3. Productive Effort as a Means of Serving God
Islam emphasises the duty of every individual to work for his living. Productive enterprise is looked upon as a means of serving
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Pakistan, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Peshawar, Cantt
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